Readers ask: When to use a comma before which?

What are the 8 rules for commas?

Commas (Eight Basic Uses)

  • Use a comma to separate independent clauses.
  • Use a comma after an introductory clause or phrase.
  • Use a comma between all items in a series.
  • Use commas to set off nonrestrictive clauses.
  • Use a comma to set off appositives.
  • Use a comma to indicate direct address.
  • Use commas to set off direct quotations.

How do you use which?

In non-defining clauses, use which. Remember, which is as disposable as a sandwich bag. If you can remove the clause without destroying the meaning of the sentence, the clause is nonessential and you can use which.

How do you know where to put commas?

Comma Use

  1. Use commas to separate independent clauses when they are joined by any of these seven coordinating conjunctions: and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet.
  2. Use commas after introductory a) clauses, b) phrases, or c) words that come before the main clause.

Which used in a sentence?

Use “which” when the information in your subordinate clause (“which was flooded last month”) is non-essential to the meaning of the sentence. If you took away the subordinate clause, the reader would still know what house you are referring to. 2. I returned the book that I bought last night.

Does this sentence need a comma?

Use a comma before any coordinating conjunction that links two independent clauses. Use a comma after a dependent clause that starts a sentence. Use commas to offset appositives from the rest of the sentence. Use commas to separate items in a series.

How important is a comma?

Commas, commas, and more commas. Commas help your reader figure out which words go together in a sentence and which parts of your sentences are most important. Using commas incorrectly may confuse the reader, signal ignorance of writing rules, or indicate carelessness.

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Which vs what questions?

“Which” is more formal when asking a question that requires a choice between a number of items. You can use “What” if you want, though. Generally speaking, you can replace the usage of “which” with “what” and be OK grammatically. It doesn’t always work the other way around, however.

Which is correct sentence?

Subject-Verb Agreement. In order for a sentence to be grammatically correct, the subject and verb must both be singular or plural. In other words, the subject and verb must agree with one another in their tense. If the subject is in plural form, the verb should also be in plur al form (and vice versa).

How do you use which in a question?

We use which in questions as a determiner and interrogative pronoun to ask for specific information:

  1. ‘Which car are we going in?
  2. Which museums did you visit?
  3. Which do you prefer?
  4. In the Young Cook of Britain competition, the finalists were asked which famous person they would like to cook for.

What are the 4 types of commas?

There are four types of comma: the listing comma, the joining comma, the gapping comma and bracketing commas.

When listing three things do you use a comma?

Use commas to separate three or more items in a series. Lists of three or more words, phrases, and clauses require commas between each item. For example: a. The fox shouts, cackles, and yells.

How do you properly use punctuation?

Punctuation shows how the sentence should be read and makes the meaning clear. Every sentence should include at least a capital letter at the start, and a full stop, exclamation mark or question mark at the end. This basic system indicates that the sentence is complete.

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Which used in grammar?

The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use. If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”

Who and which sentences?

They connect a sentence’s noun or noun phrase to a modifying or explanatory clause. You can use a comma before who, that, and which when the clause is non-restrictive (non-essential to the sentence), or omit the comma for restrictive clauses (essential to understanding the sentence).

Which vs who grammar?

You can be, if you spread the word: Who is always associated with people. Which is used with things. Your writing, at its best.

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