Quick Answer: When to add an apostrophe s?

How do you know when to add an apostrophe?

An apostrophe is a small punctuation mark ( ‘ ) placed after a noun to show that the noun owns something. The apostrophe will always be placed either before or after an s at the end of the noun owner. Always the noun owner will be followed (usually immediately) by the thing it owns. 2.

What are the 3 Uses of apostrophe?

The apostrophe has three uses: 1) to form possessive nouns; 2) to show the omission of letters; and 3) to indicate plurals of letters, numbers, and symbols.

Is it Chris’s or Chris ‘?

Which is correct, Chris’s chair or Chris‘ chair? James’s car or James’ car? Actually, both ways are correct. If a proper name ends with an s, you can add just the apostrophe or an apostrophe and an s.

Which is correct the Smiths or the Smith’s?

The Smith’s (with an apostrophe before the s) is the possessive of “Smith” and indicates one person ownership. The Smiths‘ (with an apostrophe after the s) is plural possessive and means the possession of more than one “Smith” of something (see Rule 2 below) like “The Smiths‘ house is white.”

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe Examples

  • Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. (
  • O holy night!
  • Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. (
  • O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. (
  • Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! (
  • Welcome, O life!

What are the rules for apostrophes?

The general rule is that the possessive of a singular noun is formed by adding an apostrophe and s, whether the singular noun ends in s or not. The possessive of a plural noun is formed by adding only an apostrophe when the noun ends in s, and by adding both an apostrophe and s when it ends in a letter other than s.

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Where do we use apostrophes examples?

When using a singular noun, the apostrophe is used before the s. For example: “The squirrel’s nuts were stashed in a hollow tree.” When using a plural noun, the apostrophe goes after the s. For example: “The squirrels’ nuts were hidden in several hollow trees throughout the forest.”

Do I need an apostrophe?

Any time you have an it’s or an its in your writing, double-check the sentence. If you can say “it is” in its place, then you DO need the apostrophe. If its is showing something has possession or ownership of something, then you do NOT need an apostrophe and using its is correct. The dog was chewing on its bone.

What is correct James or James’s?

(Short version, both James‘ and James’s can be considered correct). For possessive plurals of names ending in S, you first have to form the plural. Like any noun ending in S, the plural adds -ES, so one James, two Jameses. For possessive, just add an apostrophe: Jameses’.

Is it Jones or Jones’s?

All the English style guides insist that singular possessives are formed with -‘s and plurals with only -‘, so the possessive of Jones (singular) is Jones’s and the possessive of Joneses is Joneses’.

Is it Thomas or Thomas’s?

But the former is more popular in professional publishing. So a safe solution is to treat singular nouns ending in S the same way you treat singulars nouns not ending in S: Form the possessive with an apostrophe and an S. Thomas’s house. The important thing to remember is that Thomas is singular.

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Is S or S’s?

CMOS 7.20 states that in the case of a place-name ending with “s,” the “s’s” formation is not used; e.g., the United States’. However, 7.17 uses Kansas’s as an example of proper usage.

Is it Williams or Williams’s?

The Associated Press Stylebook recommends just an apostrophe: It’s Tennessee Williams‘ best play. But most other authorities endorse ‘s: Williams’s. Williams’s means “belonging to Williams.” It is not the plural form of Williams. People’s names become plural the way most other words do.

Do you add an apostrophe s to a name?

Names are pluralized like regular words. Add -es for names ending in “s” or “z” and adds for everything else. When indicating the possessive, if there is more than one owner add an apostrophe to the plural; if there is one owner, adds to the singular (The Smiths’ car vs. Smith’s car).

Do you put apostrophe S after last name?

When making your last name plural, you don’t need to add an apostrophe! The apostrophe makes the name possessive. If your last name ends in –s, -z, -ch, -sh, or -x, you add -es to your last name to make it plural. For example: Happy Holidays from the Joneses!

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